Snoopy Supports Tech Expo 2015, Santa Rosa, CA

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Centers for Independent Living

The term “center for independent living” has been inverted throughout the course of its existence so that some have come to know it as “independent living center.” The fact remains, the two are one in the same, where both are endowed with their respective acronyms CIL and ILC. The Independent Living Research Utilization (ILRU) website provides a textbook definition, informing us that “the term ‘center for independent living’ means a consumer‑controlled, community‑based, cross‑disability, nonresidential private nonprofit agency that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities and provides an array of independent living services” (Source). To put the matter more simply, a CIL/ILC is a place where persons with disabilities can go to gain independent living skills, to get help with learning how to live independently.

And while knowing what a CIL/ILC is and can do is important, it is from the center in Berkeley that we get a brief history: “The Center for Independent Living, Inc. (CIL) emerged from the independent living movement of the 1960’s as a powerful social catalyst on the University of California at Berkeley campus. There Ed Roberts, Hale Zukas, and Jan McEwan Brown joined forces to lead a movement that made the full academic and social life of the college accessible to all. In 1972, these students along with community members formally incorporated as the Center for Independent Living, Inc.” (Source). As seen in the previous post and here, the Ed Roberts center is a tribute to the work of these individuals.

Ed Roberts CenterEd Roberts

Since then, and in addition to this incredible campus, CIL/ILCs have turned up all over America, with a screen shot of their locations in Northern California revealing their prominence in our state alone:

CIL NorCal

By clicking the ILRU Projects link from their website, you can find a guide to CIL/ILCs wherever in the United States, by clicking any state from the map:

ILRU

Disability Services & Legal Center (DSLC) is proud to be a part of the vast number of CIL/ILCs that have sprung up around the country, going so far as to not only embrace its status as a center for disabled individuals, but by offering free legal services to those who come up against the barriers that still haunt the disabled community.

DSLC file

To learn more about DSLC, you can visit the website at any time, and you can drop by for one of our orientations, Mondays at 1:30pm. And if you’re interested in learning about our services and meeting the staff in person, you’ll have a chance when you come to visit Tech Expo 2015. We hope to see you there!

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Universal Design

UD 1

Can you imagine the structures of a world without barriers? In truth, the prospect has been contemplated, due in large part to the disabled community. The notion comes off as so rewarding to society that a website has been devoted specifically to the cause. And it is here that we can find a well-articulated definition of exactly what Universal Design is:

“Universal Design involves designing products and spaces so that they can be used by the widest range of people possible. Universal Design evolved from Accessible Design, a design process that addresses the needs of people with disabilities. Universal Design goes further by recognizing that there is a wide spectrum of human abilities. Everyone, even the most able-bodied person, passes through childhood, periods of temporary illness, injury and old age. By designing for this human diversity, we can create things that will be easier for all people to use” (Source).

How do you like that? Universal Design considers more than just producing structures that are accessible for the disabled community; not that this isn’t worthy in and of itself. It sounds as though Universal Design is a philosophy that the creative minds and engineers of the world should embrace. It is a way of thinking that is inclusive, a way of bringing humanity together. Consider a great, visually presented example:

UD 3

The effect here is stunning. A simple comparative analysis tells us precisely what the captions convey, that when thinking with the diversity of society in mind, the outcome eliminates the potential for polarization and instead, incites unification along with — satisfyingly enough — aesthetic principle. The second picture presents us with an ideal world that not only serves scope of utility, but brings out the beauty to be found in architectural creativity. Here we have the idea embodied in a more modern form:

UD 5

Coined by Ronald L. Mace of North Carolina State University, Universal Design has come to be further studied through collaboration with architects, product designers, engineers and environmental designers, culminating in seven basic principles:

1. Equitable Use: The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.
2. Flexibility in Use: The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.
3. Simple and Intuitive Use: Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level.
4. Perceptible Information: The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities.
5. Tolerance for Error: The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions.
6. Low Physical Effort: The design can be used efficiently and comfortably with minimum fatigue.
7. Size and Space for Approach and Use: Appropriate size and space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of user’s body size, posture, or mobility. (Source)

To think of Universal Design applying primarily to architecture is understandable, but we can find elements of the philosophy in one of our most used products of daily life, the standard door knob:

UD 4

In the next case, we have the features of a bathroom accommodating the products we use, as well as accommodating the need for safety — the items in view have been sleekly modified so that they can be used as grab bars:

UD 8

One thing you can count on is that Disability Services & Legal Center (DSLC) supports the philosophy of Universal Design in its entirety. To celebrate and empower the cause, DSLC conducts a technology exposition on a yearly basis, right here in Santa Rosa, California. Here you can learn about the products and services which embrace Universal Design as they are united in a day of presentation and exploration. We hope you’ll take a moment to come and see the wonderful displays and the people who accompany them, which is really a fancy way of saying:

Join us for Tech Expo 2015!

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Twenty-Five Years of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

ADAflyr

From Wikepedia:

“The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is a law that was enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1990. In 1986, the National Council on Disability (NCD) recommended enactment of an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and drafted the first version of the bill which was introduced in the House and Senate in 1988. Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) authored what became the final bill and was its chief sponsor in the Senate. Harkin delivered part of his introduction speech in sign language, saying it was so his deaf brother could understand. It was signed into law on July 26, 1990, by President George H. W. Bush, and later amended with changes effective January 1, 2009.”

“The ADA is a wide-ranging civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on disability. It affords similar protections against discrimination to Americans with disabilities as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which made discrimination based on race, religion, sex, national origin, and other characteristics illegal. In addition, unlike the Civil Rights Act, the ADA also requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and imposes accessibility requirements on public accommodations.”

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Help honor and celebrate the ADA by participating in or attending DSLC’s Tech Expo 2015:

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